SPEAKERS

David Dagenais, CHSP, CHFM, FASHE
Sr. Director of Plant Operations, Clinical Engineering, Emergency Management, Safety Officer
Wentworth-Douglass Hospital

Dave Dagenais, CHSP, CHFM, FASHE, is currently the director of plant operations and safety officer at Wentworth-Douglass Hospital in Dover, New Hampshire. Dave has been involved in the health care field and code development process for more than 18 years. He currently sits on NFPA Health Care Section Executive Board, NFPA 730 Technical Committee Guide for Premises Security, NFPA 731 Technical Committee Standard for the Installation of Electronic Premises Security Systems, NFPA Health Care Section Codes and Standards Review Committee, NFPA 99 Technical Collating Committee, NFPA 99 Technical Committee on Electrical Systems and NFPA 99 Technical Committee on Emergency Management and Security, and has been appointed to the NFPA Healthcare Interpretation Task Force. Dave has served as president of the NH Society of Healthcare Engineers and president of the New England Healthcare Engineers Society, and is a Past President Region 1 Board member for the American Society for Health Care Engineering and the chair of the American Society of Health Care Engineering Advocacy Committee. He is a Certified Healthcare Facility Manager, a Certified Healthcare Safety Professional, and a Senior ASHE member (SASHE) with the American Society for Health Care Engineering.  

Ross Bernstein
Bio Coming Soon.
Abstract

The best-selling author of nearly 50 sports books, Ross Bernstein is an award-winning peak performance hall of fame business speaker who's keynoted conferences for Fortune 500 companies on all seven continents and has been featured on CNN, ESPN, Fox News, and “CBS This Morning,” as well as in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and USA Today. Ross' program is all about the DNA of what makes champions in sports so unique and how that relates to business. It’s based on a series of books he wrote in which he was able to interview more than 1,000 professional athletes and coaches that all had one thing in common — they were all members of championship teams. In his research he concluded that the same metrics and characteristics that were common among champions in sports, were also common among peak performers in business. There are reasons certain teams win consistently, whereas others don't... and Ross explains why. It's based largely on the "Good to Great" concept of how the best companies are able to separate themselves from the rest of the pack through servant leadership, by creating a culture of excellence, by developing deeper relationships, and by giving extraordinary customer service. Ross weaves sports stories, about the DNA of champions, along with stories of companies who he has worked with around the world — and shares best practice ideas on ways to overcome disruption, while ultimately building stronger relationships. At the core of his message is the simple fact that we like to do business with people who we trust, who we like, and who just “get it”

 

— CHAMPIONS. In an engaging, provocative, and visually entertaining style, Ross will use inspirational stories and poignant life lessons from the world of sports to show attendees how to:

  • Create a “culture of excellence” by giving extraordinary customer service...

  • Generate momentum by utilizing the "currency of karma"...

  • Follow their moral compasses to win "the right way," with respect, ethics, and integrity...

  • Be better leaders and create more "buy-in" by embracing change and failure...

  • Evolve from "order takers" to "trusted partners" by enhancing the quality of their relationships...

Jim Kendig, MS, CHSP, CHCM, CHEM, LHRM 
Field Director, Surveyor Management and Development Accreditation and Certification Operations
The Joint Commission

James Kendig is the Field Director for the Life Safety Code Surveyors/Engineers at The Joint Commission. In this role, he oversees half (approximately 40) of the surveyor cadre who specialize in surveying The Joint Commission’s life safety, environment of care, and emergency management standards.

 

Previously, Mr. Kendig also served as a Joint Commission Life Safety Code Surveyor.  Prior to joining The Joint Commission, he was a Vice President and Safety Officer for a four-hospital system in Florida on the “Space Coast”.

 

Mr. Kendig maintains certifications as a Certified Healthcare Safety Professional, Certified Hazard Control Manager, Certified Healthcare Environmental Manager, and is a licensed Healthcare Risk Manager. He serves on the faculty of the University of Central Florida’s Licensed Risk Management Program. Mr. Kendig holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania. He is currently a resident of Florida. 

Abstract

The best-selling author of nearly 50 sports books, Ross Bernstein is an award-winning peak performance hall of fame business speaker who's keynoted conferences for Fortune 500 companies on all seven continents and has been featured on CNN, ESPN, Fox News, and “CBS This Morning,” as well as in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and USA Today.  Ross' program is all about the DNA of what makes champions in sports so unique and how that relates to business.  It’s based on a series of books he wrote in which he was able to interview more than 1,000 professional athletes and coaches that all had one thing in common — they were all members of championship teams. In his research he concluded that the same metrics and characteristics that were common among champions in sports, were also common among peak performers in business.  There are reasons certain teams win consistently, whereas others don't... and Ross explains why.  It's based largely on the "Good to Great" concept of how the best companies are able to separate themselves from the rest of the pack through servant leadership, by creating a culture of excellence, by developing deeper relationships, and by giving extraordinary customer service. Ross weaves sports stories, about the DNA of champions, along with stories of companies who he has worked with around the world — and shares best practice ideas on ways to overcome disruption, while ultimately building stronger relationships. At the core of his message is the simple fact that we like to do business with people who we trust, who we like, and who just “get it” — CHAMPIONS.

 

Learning Objectives

In an engaging, provocative, and visually entertaining style, Ross will use inspirational stories and poignant life lessons from the world of sports to show attendees how to:  

  • Create a “culture of excellence” by giving extraordinary customer service... 

  • Generate momentum by utilizing the "currency of karma"...  

  • Follow their moral compasses to win "the right way," with respect, ethics, and integrity...  

  • Be better leaders and create more "buy-in" by embracing change and failure...  

  • Evolve from "order takers" to "trusted partners" by enhancing the quality of their relationships...  

 
 
 
 
 
Darin May
Partner, Mechanical + Fire Protection Engineer
Dunham Associates

With over 20 years of experience designing HVAC, plumbing, and fire protection systems, Darin has established himself as a leader in Healthcare engineering design. Darin leads Dunham Associates' most challenging and complex hospital and clinic projects. He is known for exceptional client services, meticulous design, a thorough understanding of building codes, and knowledge of healthcare industry trends and best practices. Over the past two years, Dunham has worked with some of Minnesota’s largest Healthcare providers to address COVID-19 related issues and worked to help make spaces safer for staff, patients, and visitors. Darin holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University and currently serves as a Partner in the firm.

Eric Krause
Regional Facilities and Engineering Manager
Allina Health

Eric Krause serves as the Regional Facilities and Engineering Manager, providing day-to-day Facilities and Engineering support for United, Mercy, Unity Hospitals as well as Children’s of St Paul.

 

His primary responsibility includes leadership of Facilities, Regulatory Compliance, and Construction for the previously mentioned sites, which have a combined total of over 2.6 million square feet in size and are licensed for 1,213 patient beds. Eric has a Master Plumbing and a 1B Boiler Operators license. He is also a Certified Healthcare Facilities Manager (CHFM), Certified Healthcare Constructor (CHC), and serves as the Minnesota Healthcare Engineers Association president.

Abstract

With the treatments that have been used for COVID-19 in hospital settings, many facilities have had to assess their bulk oxygen tank and delivery systems.  This presentation will review the design standards for bulk oxygen tanks and oxygen pipe sizing that were used before COVID-19 and how the clinical treatments (ventilators, heated high flow nose cannula, Bi-PAP) have impacted your oxygen tank and delivery systems.   We will review assessment tools that can be used to understand the limitations of your current oxygen system.  We will look at a case study of how to use the information gathered in an assessment of your system with clinical staff to review patient placement within your facility.  We will also present lessons learned from the facility manager's point of view before and during COVID-19 surges in patient census.  We will cover what should be done prior to a surge and what can be done during a surge to ensure the performance of your oxygen system.

Learning Objectives

Assessing your bulk oxygen system from the bulk tank to the patient room outlets during COVID-19

  1. Bulk tank storage capacity

  2. Vaporizer capacity

  3. Regulator capacity

  4. Pipe size capacity

Learn to assess how ventilators and other oxygen treatments for COVID-19 impact your oxygen system.  Understand the importance of working with your oxygen system supplier and clinical staff to make sure that your oxygen system is maintaining patient care.


Review what can be done with your oxygen supply system to maintain peak performance during an increased system demand scenario.

Cathy Hall
Senior Lighting Engineering
HGA

Understanding that light is fundamental to architecture and essential for human well-being, Catherine works with teams to determine the extent, nature and type of lighting that will aesthetically enhance buildings. She strives to make spaces dynamic, while remaining sensitive to the intended use of space, energy conservation, and sustainability. 

Jeff Harris
Director of Engineering
HGA

Jeff oversees the design of the mechanical systems for award winning healthcare projects throughout his 30 year career. Jeff regularly gives public and educational talks relating to healthcare engineering throughout the United States and has contributed to numerous publications.  Jeff was the vice chair of the Modular Construction group for the 2020 FGI Emergency Conditions committee and led the mechanical engineering team for STAAT Mod, a temporary COVID treatment unit and a Fast Company 2020 Innovation by Design honoree.

Jill Imig
Mechanical Department Leader
HGA

Jill, HGA’s Milwaukee Mechanical Department Leader, has 15 years of experience in the design of plumbing systems for health care buildings.  She is highly involved with the Medical Gas Professional Healthcare Organization (MGPHO) and the American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE). She is a past president of ASPE Wisconsin Chapter.

Matthew Mikolainis
Senior Project Manager
HGA

As project manager, Matthew meets regularly with healthcare clients to communicate project needs to the entire team. He immerses himself with the project details from the beginning, scheduling team meetings, setting budgets, assessing goals and gaging team efforts for on-time, on-budget project delivery.

Abstract

In today’s Healthcare design and construction environment, there is an increased demand for cost certainty and compressed design and construction schedules.  These projects require elevated collaboration and impactful, timely decision making to be successful. The engineering design process is evolving to meet these demands. This presentation will focus on the process and tools engineers use to establish criteria for engineering systems in collaboration with the healthcare facilities staff for rapid evaluation by key stakeholders In depth review and specific examples of how tools such as an A3, the component team and ‘big rooms’ will demonstrate how they are vital to continuous verification of project budget, schedule and buy in as the engineering systems are fully developed in a collaborative, multi-disciplinary manner.  Specific examples related to current trends in healthcare facility engineering will be shared.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe successful methods for evaluating and recommending engineering systems

  2. Understand how an A3 communicates options, analysis, and recommendations

  3. Recognize the value of continuous budget verification incorporated in component team design process

  4. Take away "lessons learned" from recent healthcare projects

Mike Stark
Senior Manager, Project Planning & Development - Healthcare
Kraus-Anderson Construction

Mike is an industry veteran of 12 years with experience on the owner and construction manager side while also having a degree in architecture from the University of Minnesota. With this diverse stakeholder background Mike brings a unique perspective to his role leading the projecting planning and development for Kraus-Anderson’s healthcare team. He works closely with stakeholders early in project conception to create an organized and informed plan that can be used to guide execution when the project moves to construction. He is a die-hard Gopher Football fan that can be seen every Saturday in the Fall cheering on his Gophers!

Tim Kittila, PE
Manager, Facilities Assessments
Kraus-Anderson Construction

Tim leads Kraus-Anderson's Facility Assessment services.  Tim is a professional engineering (mechanical) and began his career in data centers.

Abstract

Facility managers continue to be the bearer of bad news of failed equipment, pipes, boilers, HVAC systems, roofs.  The goal of this review will allow facility managers a path to get ahead of facility failures and become proactive in maintenance upkeep.  The presentation will review how to put together a 5, 10, 20 year long term facility plan.  We will review the IFMA standard of FCA’s (Facility Condition Assessments) and also help measure a facility through the Facility Condition Index (FCI) methodology.  The presentation will provide the steps required to ensure you have the most accurate data of your facility to help your C-Suite make more informed decisions in regards to facility improvements and move from a reactive mindset to a proactive planning methodology.  The five steps methodology will also include the possible tools that could be used in order to get better info about your facility.

Learning Objectives

  1. Teach the 5 step methodology

  2. Review the IFMA FCA standards and FCI

  3. Importance of a long-term facility maintenance plan

  4. Identify tools that can be used to improve findings

 
Tony Breitlow
Senior Project Manager & Associate
Eppstein Uhen Architects

Tony is a Senior Project Manager at EUA with over 20 years of experience specializing in Healthcare.  His goal is to help each client provide first-class patient care through great architecture.

Brant Holeman
Project Engineer
RTM Engineering Consultants

Mr. Holeman has 19 years of experience designing and evaluating HVAC systems for healthcare facilities.  For the last six years he has been a Subject Matter Expert in his firm for compounding pharmacies and cleanrooms.  He has experience with USP 797/800, 503B facilities, temporary compounding provisions, remodeling, start-up, and commissioning.

John Kaltenberg
Senior Project Manager  
Findorff

John is a professional engineer and joined the Findorff healthcare team in 2016.  He has over 18 years experience in construction of medical, public, private and educational facilities.  His primary responsibilities include the day-to-day oversight of construction management activities during preconstruction, construction and project closeout. In this role, he is main point of client contact, and provides ongoing communications to the client, architect, and all relevant project team members.  He is also affiliated with the AGC of WI and WHEA.

Hospitals have two options when undertaking the USP-required upgrades—build a new facility or renovate the existing pharmacy. Renovation can be a more financially wise, but decision but can present a greater number of challenges. Renovating an existing pharmacy means maintaining operational standards and capacity throughout each phase of construction. In this session we'll uncover the criteria used by the hospital’s pharmacy and facilities staff, construction manager, and the architect to determine the best decision in meeting USP compliance. 

We'll discuss:

  • Strategies to determine whether new construction or renovation is best suited for the facility

  • Lessons learned from upgrades to (4) separate pharmacy projects

  • What to avoid, and what to implement in your project

  • Design, MEP, testing, and other special considerations to incorporate in the process

  • Keys to communication and collaboration across the entire OAC team

Determining a path to meet USP 797/800 regulations must be carefully planned to minimize impact and disruptions to the essential services your pharmacies provide. This session will help you gain insight on how to establish a plan-of-action and how to achieve compliance as quickly and as efficiently.

Learning Objectives

Eliminating the pain from complying with the Healthcare Pharmacy requirements by learning:

  1. Separate pharmacy projects from upgrades to (4) Strategies to determine whether new construction or renovation is best suited for the facility

  2. What to avoid, and what to implement in your project

  3. Design, MEP, testing, and other special considerations to incorporate in the process

  4. Keys to communication and collaboration across the entire OAC team

Abstract
 
Robbie Danko
Business Development Director
The Boldt Company

Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

The technology revolution is quickly changing the way we live and the expectations of our life experiences. The consumer lifestyle has become highly personalized and available on-demand from personal wearables, app-based access to information, and intelligent home devices. As healthcare providers continue to improve the patient, provider, and administrator experiences, data and technology are essential to that care. 
 
In this session, our panel will discuss how integrated technology in the healthcare environment will shape the experiences of all stakeholders and how the intelligent nature of these spaces, from fully integrated treatment rooms to energy conservation, will shape the hospitals of the future. 
 
Our panelists will provide a diverse perspective on the importance of data integration to make more informed decisions that improve the performance of the built environment. Panelists include a former healthcare administrator who will speak to overall patient experience and management; a healthcare facilities expert will highlight the growing demand for migrating dated systems to new technologies, and a low voltage systems designer will discuss the importance of integrating various systems to access real-time data for reliability-centered maintenance.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the evolving role of technology and its impact on the healthcare environment and an administrators ability to leverage connected data to improve operations.

  2. Define some of the expectations of the tech-savvy talent you want to attract, hire and retain.

  3. Explore the convergence of information technology and operating technology and its role in delivering the comforts and amenities that define an optimal patient experience.

 
Mark Bradby
Director of Engineering
CMTA

Mark has over 21 years of mechanical systems experience and has been involved in the design of various science and technology facilities. Throughout his career, Mark has been passionate about sustainable design, and continues to advocate for the use of sustainable technology and techniques in buildings. His passion for sustainability, coupled with his mechanical design experience, helps clients work towards buildings that work efficiently.

Kevin Mussler, PE, LEED AP, CxA
Vice President, Mechanical Engineer
CMTA

Kevin is the managing partner of the Lexington, Washington DC, and Richmond offices of CMTA. With nearly 30 years of experience, he has completed healthcare projects across the country ranging from clinic upgrades to full-service hospitals. His projects focus on sustainable design strategies, typically including features such as daylighting, geothermal HVAC, and energy-efficient lighting. He also has extensive knowledge of the design of variable air volume systems and fan optimization.

Ned Rector
Principal, Senior Mechanical Engineer
CMTA

Ned has over 32 years of building mechanical systems experience. He has worked on several high-profile healthcare projects and has been involved in many aspects of the mechanical engineering and mechanical construction business. His professional roles have included consulting engineer, mechanical contractor, HVAC service manager, and campus capital projects director involving all construction types. He is experienced in all facets of mechanical building design, including plumbing, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, fire protection, and automatic control systems.

Abstract

The healthcare industry needs to be included in the global conversation around a sustainable culture. As healthcare providers strive for healthier communities, improved patient services and a sustainable future, drastic energy reduction goals need to be in the forefront. There are proven strategies to start projects on the path to drive down Energy Use Intensity (EUI), reduce combustibles, and achieve an ENERGY STAR score of 90 or higher.  This course explores those strategies through case studies of real-life projects.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain energy baselines in healthcare facilities 

  2. Understand energy consumption in healthcare facilities

  3. What are ‘unconventional’ and ‘conventional’ energy reduction strategies and how can they be used to achieve significant energy savings

  4. Demonstrate how taking the long view and factoring in ROI leads to better financial outcomes

 
Lennon Peake
Director
Koffel Compliance, LLC

Lennon Peake is the Director at Koffel Compliance, a fire protection engineering and code consulting firm headquartered in Columbia, Maryland.  He has extensive experience in health care occupancy code requirements and CMS and Joint Commission licensure and accreditation surveys.  He serves on the ASHE Regulatory Affairs and Member Tools Task Force committees, is subject matter expert for Just Ask ASHE and serves on several NFPA technical committees including the NFPA 101 Technical Committee on Health Care Occupancies.

Abstract

The presentation will detail changes and proposed changes to the Life Safety Code since the 2012 edition which is currently enforced by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.  Many of the changes between the 2012 and 2021 are beneficial, however some requirements are more restrictive.  Health care facility personnel are continually being asked to do more with limited resources.  The information contained in this presentation will detail more recent Life Safety Code changes to offer solutions for deficient conditions which require substantial financial investment to comply with the Life Safety Code 2012 Edition.  The content of the presentation will also make the attendees more familiar with the Life Safety Code requirements when a newer edition is adopted by CMS.

 

The session will also review the status of LSC 2024 changes.  Many of the changes in the first draft are beneficial to health care organizations and design professionals.

Learning Objectives

  1. Upon completion of the program, the participants will able to identify beneficial changes in LSC NFPA 101, 2015 and 2018 editions.

  2. Upon completion of the program, the participants will able to identify beneficial changes in LSC NFPA 101 2021 edition.

  3. Upon completion of the program, the participants will be able to justify existing conditions in their facility based on a subsequent edition of NFPA 101 since the 2012 edition. 

  4. Upon completion of the program, the participants will be able to identify LSC 2024 Public Inputs which entered the First Draft Report.

Devin Hugie
President & CEO
DHI Consulting

Devin has a Master of Business Degree in Healthcare Management and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Management both from California Coast University; Additionally, he has a certificate of facility Management from the University of California Irvine. Devin is recognized by the American Hospital Association as a Certified Healthcare Facility Manager (CHFM) and a Certified Healthcare Constructor (CHC); Additionally, in 2018 received his Fellow status (FASHE). Devin received the outstanding member award from the California Society of Healthcare Engineers (CSHE) in 2011 and the Presidents award for outstanding leadership in 2013, and the Distinguished member award in 2014. Additionally, Devin is recognized by the Board of Certified Healthcare Safety Management as a Certified Healthcare Safety Professional Senior Status (CHSP) with the Fire Safety Management endorsement (FSM) and is a Certified Healthcare Emergency professional (CHEP). Devin also is a Senior Certified Healthcare Mechanic, and he has numerous professional licenses such as Universal 608, Unlimited L.A Steam License, and is BOC Level I and II certifications. Devin is also a Certified Life Safety Specialist (CLSS-HC) and a Certified Emergency Power System Specialist (CEPSS-HC) with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and participated in the exam development for both certifications. 

Rick Joslin
Senior Advisor, Healthcare Strategy
Accruent 

For more than 22 years with Accruent, Rick Joslin has helped healthcare systems navigate the ins-and-outs of managing maintenance and service activities within their organizations. With over 35 years in maintenance management industry, at levels from technician, to director, to inspector/compliance surveyor, he is known for promoting continuous improvement, driving operational efficiency, increasing resource utilization, and ensuring regulatory success. As the Senior Advisor, Healthcare Strategy and as a Senior Solutions Architect, Healthcare, Rick leverages LEAN thinking and Six Sigma processes to guide our customers in the development of short- and long-term goals for measurable, continuous results across a wide variety of healthcare environments, while also helping them to identify gaps and inefficiencies in business processes and driving operational excellence. His broad knowledge of healthcare operations and regulatory requirements, coupled with an intimate knowledge of CMMS systems, allow him to assist customers in developing easily-implemented solutions t

David Lockhart
Support Services Administrator 
Kaiser Permanente

Dave is the Region 9 Advisory Board Member for ASHE. He is also the Immediate Past President and Sustainability Liaison for his local state chapter, CSHE. Dave has worked at every level of facility operations, being involved with opening, operating, expanding and improving facilities operations over the past 29 years. Dave has a certificate in Industrial Electricity, an Associate degree in Mechanical Electrical Technologies, a bachelor’s degree from Sacramento State in Vocational Education. Dave obtained the CHFM designation from the American Hospital Association, his C.E.M. as a certified energy manger, he received the Emerging Leader recognition and his Fellow Status with the American Society for Healthcare Engineering.

Ryan Schramm
Manager of Plant Operations
M Health Fairview - St. Joseph's Hospital

Ryan Schramm serves as Manager of Plant Operations for M Health Fairview and provides day-to-day operational support at the St. Joseph’s Hospital, located in St. Paul, MN. His primary responsibility includes leadership of Facilities, Safety, Compliance and Construction. Ryan is a Certified Healthcare Facilities Manager (CHFM), Certified Healthcare Constructor (CHC) and possess fifteen years of combined experience in healthcare facilities management and construction management. Ryan currently serves as a member on ASHE’s Reliability-centered Maintenance (RCM) Task Force, Member’s Tools Task Force (MTTF), Healthcare Facility Data Standardization Working Group and is an Executive Officer for the Minnesota Healthcare Engineering Association (MHCEA). 

Andy Woommavovah
National Leader - Facility Management & Construction
Trinity Health

Andy Woommavovah (woom-a-voy-yah) is the System Leader for Facilities and Construction for Trinity Health based in Livonia, Michigan. The Trinity Health system includes 88 hospitals, 131 continuing care locations, the second largest PACE program in the country, 125 urgent care locations and many other health and well-being services. Andy is responsible for developing and leading a national facility management and construction program. Andy has over 26 yrs of experience in facility management and construction that has been gained from a cross-section of sectors that includes the United States Army, Civil Works and Healthcare.  Andy is a Certified Healthcare Facility Manager (CHFM) and is a retired United States Army Lieutenant Colonel (Engineer). He is a Veteran of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom and is the recipient of the Legion of Merit and Bronze Star for exceptional military service. Andy holds a Master of Science Degree from the University of Oklahoma in Construction Administration, a Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering Design and an Associate’s Degree in Construction.  He is a 2014 graduate of the United States Command and General Staff College where he studied Joint Military Planning and Strategic Military Leadership.

Abstract

Because 82% to 83% of the total cost of a facility is related to owning and operating it over its useful life, it is crucial for health care professionals to leverage many data sources to support better-informed decisions and action. The goal for any asset is to function throughout its life cycle to its greatest capabilities, all while consuming the least amount of resources possible, and limiting operational impact/downtime.

Ultimately, the journey toward creating more reliable buildings and systems must be strategic. When defendable asset data is combined with the uptime elements and a reliability centered framework, organizations can optimize performance and begin delivering services at the highest value possible.

Furthermore, as health facilities professionals continue to invest in a robust asset life cycle management program, focus begins to shift toward seeking value rather than focusing solely on up-front cost. This means prioritizing workload to maximize existing assets and extend useful life expectancy, based on evidence of need. 

Learning Objectives

This session will enable attendees to:

  1. Gain insight into how Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) is leveraged to determine the maintenance requirements of any physical asset.

  2. Identify opportunities to evolving our outdated “Just-in-Case" calendar-based maintenance strategy towards reducing risk, based on evidence of need.

  3. Present the Design, Instillation, Potential Failure, Failure (D-I-P-F) Curve and discuss failure patterns.

  4. Thinking beyond preventative maintenance and begin to unlock the potential of conditional-based maintenance and predictive maintenance.

John Costello
Client Executive
IMEG Corp

John Costello joined IMEG in 2014 and serves as Client Executive in the Minneapolis office. John’s clients appreciate his enthusiasm for their projects, talent for problem solving, and ability to build strong consensus.

Ryan Searles
Senior Consultant Security Assessment and Protective Services
IMEG Corp

Ryan Schramm is the Senior Systems Manager of Facilities Operations for Banner Health based in Phoenix, Arizona. He offers unique perspectives into healthcare facilities management, construction project services, regulatory compliance, and asset risk management due to his diverse background. Ryan is a Certified Healthcare Facilities Manager (CHFM), Certified Healthcare Constructor (CHC) and possess over 15 years of combined experience in healthcare facilities management and construction management. Ryan currently serves as a member on ASHE’s Reliability-centered Maintenance (RCM) Task Force, ASHE’s Member’s Tools Task Force (MTTF) and the Healthcare Facility Data Standardization Steering Committee.

Abstract

When disaster strikes, hospitals and healthcare systems are on the front line of ensuring the safety of the community and the existing vulnerable patient population. Power outages, water shortages, major accidents, active shooters and natural disasters can’t be allowed to stop your facility from providing lifesaving care to those who need it. This purpose can only be served if your hospital is resilient.

This presentation provides an outline for the first step in the resiliency process: assessing your facility’s vulnerability. A cross-section of healthcare stakeholders will discuss the stages of a thorough vulnerability assessment to determine where your facility may be at risk and the steps required for mitigation.

By taking proactive steps and making concrete plans to further the disaster preparedness of your facility, you’ll be better equipped to answer the call of your community when the worst occurs.

Learning Objectives

  1. Know the risks associated with an outdated or incomplete disaster preparedness plan.

  2. Understand the components of a comprehensive vulnerability assessment.

  3. Identify the four key areas your vulnerability assessment team should include to cover the full spectrum of threats.

  4.  List the tools and resources available for conducting a comprehensive vulnerability assessment.

 
 
 
Joe Schommer
Business Development Manager
RESA POWER

Joe Schommer has been involved in the electrical maintenance and testing industry for over 26 years. Starting as a field service technician and progressing through the disciplines, Joe has experienced the importance of maintenance and electrical testing and how these practices improve reliability and ultimately safety within your electrical distribution system. Joe brings practical application experience for improving the safety of your facility by adhering to NETA and the NFPA 70E and 70B guidelines, merging electrical safety with electrical maintenance which are both critical in regards to your electrical safety program.

Abstract

The world of electrical hazards, protection and accident prevention can be a confusing place. Hundreds of deaths and thousands of injuries can be avoided each year by following the NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace. Be prepared by arming yourself with the knowledge of the types of electrical hazards and the effects of electrical shock and flash. This session will identify the need for electrical safety as well as electrical maintenance and safety programs. Attendees will learn about arc flash hazard risk assessment, personal protective equipment (PPE) and shock and arc flash approach boundaries. Reduce your liability concerns while establishing a culture of safe work practices among employees after attending this session.

Learning Objectives

Awareness of the need for electrical safety in the workplace and the steps to take to understand where you are currently compliant or noncompliant within your facility.

 
Danielle Gathje
Vice President Hospital Operations
M Health Fairview | St. John’s Hospital

Bio Coming Soon.

Anne Guglielmo
Project Manager
Code Consultants, Inc.

Anne Guglielmo joined CCI in 2018 and has consulted on several large institutional and health care projects throughout the US. She has over 20 years of experience in the field of fire protection engineering and code & life safety consulting in the Design & Construction Industry. She is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist (CFPS), Certified Healthcare Facility Manager (CHFM), and a Certified Healthcare Safety Professional (CHSP). Anne received her Senior designation from the American Society of Healthcare Engineering in 2020. She also sits on the NFPA 101 Technical Committee on Health Care Occupancies and is an alternate on the NFPA 80 Fire Door and Other Opening Protectives Technical Committee. Primary responsibilities for fire protection and life safety consultation services include: 

  • Performing Life Safety Assessment surveys (this includes Statement of Conditions). 

  • Development of fire protection and life safety concepts used in the design of construction projects for both new and existing Health Care facilities. 

  • Engineering evaluations of performance-based design alternatives. 

  • Developing reports documenting building code requirements and fire protections concepts for presentation to building and fire officials, and for use by the project design team. 

  • Performing plan reviews of construction documents. 

  • Prior to joining CCI Anne served as a Central Office Engineer at The Joint Commission where she provided support for the Life Safety, Environment of Care and Emergency Management Standards. Anne provided interpretation of standards, reviewed equivalencies and survey reports, served as faculty for educational programs, and conducted on-site surveys.

Abstract

Active construction projects are a common source of survey findings today.  Proper implementation of ILSM’s and ICRA activities during active construction projects are essential to providing safe patient care delivery. Project staging, overlapping trades, and current Code and Accreditation requirements often pose challenges to maintaining a deficiency-free site. This discussion focuses on maintaining life safety and infection control compliance during various construction projects. Ways to limit the spread of construction related infections, balancing project needs with Code requirements and common survey findings will be shared. Current project photos will be used to pose questions to the audience to allow attendees to share experiences, processes they use, and highlight current project trends and best practices used today.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify ways to ensure Life Safety Code compliance during active construction projects.  

  2. Identify infection control activities that should be implemented to limit the spread of construction related infections.  

  3. Describe key elements of required ILSM and ICRA policies and assessments for use during construction projects.

 
Melanie Baumhover
Principal
BWBR

Melanie has gravitated towards projects that have a dramatic impact on the health and welfare of individuals, including complex health care facilities that support sophisticated medical treatment. She is a national expert in behavioral health design, including a mental health facilities design guideline for Allina Health, a large non-profit health care system; behavioral health projects for a Minnesota state-operated behavioral health treatment campus with multiple facilities for multiple acuities; and behavioral health planning for three behavioral health community facilities for the State of Washington.

Scott Holmes
Principal
BWBR

Scott is very knowledgeable about medical planning issues, is comfortable working with all types of health systems, including the special needs of community hospitals. He has worked with health systems across the United States, including CHI Health/Dignity Health, Mayo Clinic, Avera Health, and academic Medical Centers at the Universities of Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Maryland. Scott leads the behavioral facility planning process, developing planning options; refining them into Lean, flexible, and human-centered solutions; and making sure appropriate provisions are included for current medical technologies and behavioral health practices.

Abstract

When considering the future of their mental health facilities, many organizations believe that implementing a new model of care in a new building is simpler, with more options available. Yet many Inpatient mental health units don't have the ability to build dedicated new units, but are using existing spaces that may, on the outset, seem less than ideal for state-of-the-art facilities. Using several real-world example projects, this session will describe practical strategies and ideas for renovating challenging configurations to improve environments and outcomes for patients and staff.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explore strategies for reduction of aggression in mental/behavioral health environments 

  2. Explore features that can improve patient satisfaction in mental/behavioral health environments 

  3. Identify renovation strategies that are patient centered and meet safety and security needs 

  4. Describe how a human-centered design approach can improve safety and patient outcomes on inpatient mental health units

Sherry Chesak
Assistant Professor of Nursing
Mayo Clinic

Sherry Chesak is a Nurse Scientist in the Department of Nursing, Division of Nursing Research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. Her program of research is centered on interventions that promote resilience among professional and family caregivers of patients with complex health needs. She is also an equity, inclusion and diversity scientist and studies methods to enhance individuals’ sense of belonging within healthcare organizations. She received a Master’s degree in Nursing Education from Winona State University and a PhD in Nursing from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. She has attended multiple trainings for teaching resilience principles and mindfulness practices and is certified by the Global Resilience and Inner Transformation Institute as a Resilience Trainer.

Abstract

There are multiple contemporary factors that contribute to healthcare worker burnout which have dire consequences at both the personal and professional level, as well as on safe, effective patient care. This presentation will include a description of the lived experience of burnout, the benefits of mindfulness-based practices, and specific evidence-based methods for building individual and team resilience.

Learning Objectives

​Learning Objectives Coming Soon.

 
 
Adam Moench
Account Manager
Phigenics

Adam joined Phigenics in 2021 as an Account Manager, and he recently relocated to Minnesota. His primary responsibilities include supporting current clients in operating their Water Management Programs in Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and the Dakotas.

Erika Wilson
Regional Manager
Phigenics

Erika joined Phigenics in August of 2018 as an Account Manager and currently serves as a Regional Manager throughout the Minnesota Region.  Erika is responsible for the implementation and management of Water Management Program’s (WMP’s).  Erika’s training in HACCP principles and industry guidance assist her as she contributes to the development and implementation of comprehensive WMP’s for various clients.

Abstract

This presentation will focus on reviewing the four newly revised Elements of Performance (EPs) of the Joint Commission’s (TJC) new water management standards EC 02.05.02 that went into effect on January 1st, 2022, and how they fit with current industry best practices.

The discussion will include a review of the revised Elements of Performance (EP's), and how facilities can meet these requirements using best practices provided by ASHRAE Standard 188:2021, ASHRAE Guideline 12:2020, CMS Memo 17-30, and the CDC Toolkit on Legionella. We will also help make the connection between the new EPs and the existing 7 fundamental principles to an effective Water Management Program.  These best practices include how the Water Management Team functions, describes the project, sets goals, identifies hazards present in water systems including new additions such as construction or medical device reprocessing, determines controls, and sets verification and validation protocols. The foundation of a comprehensive WMP is accurate documentation of verification and validation data that confirms the program is effective.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review key considerations from the revised Elements of Performance (EP’s) of EC 02.05.02

  2. Illustrate how a WMT can utilize ANSI/ASHRAE, CMS, and CDC guidance to achieve alignment with the new Joint Commission requirements.

  3. Prepare you to review your water management program for EC.02.05.02 alignment